MySQL

Napkin math: How much waste does Celestial Seasonings save?

Xaprb, home of innotop - Sun, 2013-12-22 19:32

I was idly reading the Celestial Seasonings box today while I made tea. Here’s the end flap:

It seemed hard to believe that they really save 3.5 million pounds of waste just by not including that extra packaging, so I decided to do some back-of-the-napkin math.

How much paper is in each package of non-Celestial-Seasonings tea? The little bag is about 2 inches by 2 inches, it’s two-sided, and there’s a tag, staple, and string. Call it 10 square inches.

How heavy is the paper? It feels about the same weight as normal copy paper. Amazon.com lists a box of 5000 sheets of standard letter-sized paper at a shipping weight of 50 pounds (including the cardboard box, but we’ll ignore that). Pretend that each sheet (8.5 * 11 inches = 93.5 square inches) is about 100 square inches. That’s .0001 pounds per square inch.

How much tea does Celestial Seasonings sell every year? Wikipedia says their sales in the US are over $100M, and they are a subsidiary of Hain Celestial, which has a lot of other large brands. Hain’s sales last year were just under $500M. $100M is a good enough ballpark number. Each box of 20 tea bags sells at about $3.20 on their website, and I think it’s cheaper at my grocery store. Call it $3.00 per box, so we’ll estimate the volume of tea bags on the high side (to make up for the low-side estimate caused by pretending there’s 100 square inches per sheet of paper). That means they sell about 33.3M boxes, or 667M bags, of tea each year.

If they put bags, tags, and strings on all of them, I estimated 10 square inches of paper per bag, so at .0001 pound per square inch that’s .001 pound of extra paper and stuff per bag. That means they’d use about 667 thousand pounds of paper to bag up all that tea.

That’s quite a difference from the 3.5 million pounds of waste they claim they save. Did I do the math wrong or assume something wrong?

Categories: MySQL

Napkin math: How much waste does Celestial Seasonings save?

Xaprb, home of innotop - Sun, 2013-12-22 00:00

I was idly reading the Celestial Seasonings box today while I made tea. Here’s the end flap:

It seemed hard to believe that they really save 3.5 million pounds of waste just by not including that extra packaging, so I decided to do some back-of-the-napkin math.

How much paper is in each package of non-Celestial-Seasonings tea? The little bag is about 2 inches by 2 inches, it’s two-sided, and there’s a tag, staple, and string. Call it 10 square inches.

How heavy is the paper? It feels about the same weight as normal copy paper. Amazon.com lists a box of 5000 sheets of standard letter-sized paper at a shipping weight of 50 pounds (including the cardboard box, but we’ll ignore that). Pretend that each sheet (8.5 * 11 inches = 93.5 square inches) is about 100 square inches. That’s .0001 pounds per square inch.

How much tea does Celestial Seasonings sell every year? Wikipedia says their sales in the US are over $100M, and they are a subsidiary of Hain Celestial, which has a lot of other large brands. Hain’s sales last year were just under $500M. $100M is a good enough ballpark number. Each box of 20 tea bags sells at about $3.20 on their website, and I think it’s cheaper at my grocery store. Call it $3.00 per box, so we’ll estimate the volume of tea bags on the high side (to make up for the low-side estimate caused by pretending there’s 100 square inches per sheet of paper). That means they sell about 33.3M boxes, or 667M bags, of tea each year.

If they put bags, tags, and strings on all of them, I estimated 10 square inches of paper per bag, so at .0001 pound per square inch that’s .001 pound of extra paper and stuff per bag. That means they’d use about 667 thousand pounds of paper to bag up all that tea.

That’s quite a difference from the 3.5 million pounds of waste they claim they save. Did I do the math wrong or assume something wrong?

Categories: MySQL

Secure your accounts and devices

Xaprb, home of innotop - Wed, 2013-12-18 20:17

This is a public service announcement. Many people I know are not taking important steps necessary to secure their online accounts and devices (computers, cellphones) against malicious people and software. It’s a matter of time before something seriously harmful happens to them.

This blog post will urge you to use higher security than popular advice you’ll hear. It really, really, really is necessary to use strong measures to secure your digital life. The technology being used to attack you is very advanced, operates at a large scale, and you probably stand to lose much more than you realize.

You’re also likely not as good at being secure as you think you are. If you’re like most people, you don’t take some important precautions, and you overestimate the strength and effectiveness of security measures you do use. Password Security

The simplest and most effective way to dramatically boost your online security is use a password storage program, or password safe. You need to stop making passwords you can remember and make long, random passwords on websites. The only practical way to do this is to use a password safe.

Why? Because if you can remember the password, it’s trivially hackable. For example, passwords like 10qp29wo38ei47ru can be broken instantly. Anything you can feasibly remember is just too weak.

And, any rule you set for yourself that requires self-discipline will be violated, because you’re lazy. You need to make security easier so that you automatically do things more securely. A password safe is the best way to do that, by far. A good rule of thumb for most people is that you should not try to know your own passwords, except the password to your password safe. (People with the need to be hyper-secure will take extraordinary measures, but those aren’t practical or necessary for most of us.)

I use 1Password. Others I know of are LastPass and KeePass Password Safe. I personally wouldn’t use any others, because lesser-known ones are more likely to be malware.

It’s easy to share a password safe’s data across devices, and make a backup of it, by using a service such as Dropbox. The password safe’s files are encrypted, so the contents will not be at risk even if the file syncing service is compromised for some reason. (Use a strong password to encrypt your password safe!)

It’s important to note that online passwords are different from the password you use to log into your personal computer. Online passwords are much more exposed to brute-force, large-scale hacking attacks. By contrast, your laptop probably isn’t going to be subjected to a brute-force password cracking attack, because attackers usually need physical access to the computer to do that. This is not a reason to use a weak password for your computer; I’m just trying to illustrate how important it is to use really long, random passwords for websites and other online services, because they are frequent targets of brute-force attacks.

Here are some other important rules for password security.

  • Never use the same password in more than one service or login. If you do, someone who compromises it will be able to compromise other services you use.
  • Set your password generation program (likely part of your password safe) to make long, random passwords with numbers, special characters, and mixed case. I leave mine set to 20 characters by default. If a website won’t accept such a long password I’ll shorten it. For popular websites such as LinkedIn, Facebook, etc I use much longer passwords, 50 characters or more. They are such valuable attack targets that I’m paranoid.
  • Don’t use your web browser’s features for storing passwords and credit cards. Browsers themselves, and their password storage, are the target of many attacks.
  • Never write passwords down on paper, except once. The only paper copy of my passwords is the master password to my computer, password safe, and GPG key. These are in my bank’s safe deposit box, because if something happens to me I don’t want my family to be completely screwed. (I could write another blog post on the need for a will, power of attorney, advance medical directive, etc.)
  • Never treat any account online, no matter how trivial, as “not important enough for a secure password.”

That last item deserves a little story. Ten years ago I didn’t use a password safe, and I treated most websites casually. “Oh, this is just a discussion forum, I don’t care about it.” I used an easy-to-type password for such sites. I used the same one everywhere, and it was a common five-letter English word (not my name, if you’re guessing). Suddenly one day I realized that someone could guess this password easily, log in, change the password and in many cases the email address, and lock me out of my own account. They could then proceed to impersonate me, do illegal and harmful things in my name, etc. Worse, they could go find other places that I had accounts (easy to find — just search Google for my name or username!) and do the same things in many places. I scrambled to find and fix this problem. At the end of it, I realized I had created more than 300 accounts that could have been compromised. Needless to say, I was very, very lucky. My reputation, employment, credit rating, and even my status as a free citizen could have been taken away from me. Don’t let this happen to you! Use Two-Factor Auth

Two-factor authentication (aka 2-step login) is a much stronger mechanism for account security than a password alone. It uses a “second factor” (something you physically possess) in addition to the common “first factor” (something you know — a password) to verify that you are the person authorized to access the account.

Typically, the login process with two-factor authentication looks like this:

  • You enter your username and password.
  • The service sends a text message to your phone. The message contains a 6-digit number.
  • You must enter the number to finish logging in.

With two-factor auth in place, it is very difficult for malicious hackers to access your account, even if they know your password. Two-factor auth is way more secure than other tactics such as long passwords, but it doesn’t mean you shouldn’t also use a password safe and unique, random, non-memorized passwords.

Two-factor auth has a bunch of special ways to handle other common scenarios, such as devices that can’t display the dialog to ask for the 6-digit code, or what if you lose your cellphone, or what if you’re away from your own computer and don’t have your cellphone. Nonetheless, these edge cases are easy to handle. For example, you can get recovery codes for when you lose or don’t have your cellphone. You should store these — where else? — in your password safe.

There seems to be a perception that lots of people think two-factor auth is not convenient. I disagree. I’ve never found it inconvenient, and I use two-factor auth a lot. And I’ve never met these people, whoever they are, who think two-factor auth is such a high burden. The worst thing that happens to me is that I sometimes have to get out of my chair and get my phone from another room to log in.

Unfortunately, most websites don’t support two-factor authentication. Fortunately, many of the most popular and valuable services do, including Facebook, Google, Paypal, Dropbox, LinkedIn, Twitter, and most of the other services that you probably use which are most likely to get compromised. Here is a list of services with two-factor auth, with instructions on how to set it up for each one.

Please enable two-factor authentication if it is supported! I can’t tell you how many of my friends and family have had their Gmail, Facebook, Twitter, and other services compromised. Please don’t let this happen to you! It could do serious harm to you — worse than a stolen credit card. Secure Your Devices

Sooner or later someone is going to get access to one of your devices — tablet, phone, laptop, thumb drive. I’ve never had a phone or laptop lost or stolen myself, but it’s a matter of time. I’ve known a lot of people in this situation. One of my old bosses, for example, forgot a laptop in the seat pocket of an airplane, and someone took it and didn’t return it.

And how many times have you heard about some government worker leaving a laptop at the coffee shop and suddenly millions of people’s Social Security numbers are stolen?

Think about your phone. If someone stole my phone and it weren’t protected, they’d have access to a bunch of my accounts, contact lists, email, and a lot of other stuff I really, really do not want them messing with. If you’re in the majority of people who leave your phone completely unsecured, think about the consequences for a few minutes. Someone getting access to all the data and accounts on your phone could probably ruin your life for a long time if they wanted to.

All of this is easily preventable. Given that one or more of your devices will someday certainly end up in the hands of someone who may have bad intentions, I think it’s only prudent to take some basic measures:

  • Set the device to require a password, lock code, or pattern to be used to unlock it after it goes to sleep, when it’s idle for a bit, or when you first power it on. If someone steals your device, and can access it without entering your password, you’re well and truly screwed.
  • Use full-device encryption. If someone steals your device, for heaven’s sake don’t let them have access to your data. For Mac users, use File Vault under Preferences / Security and Privacy. Encrypt the whole drive, not just the home directory. On Windows, use TrueCrypt, and on Linux, you probably already know what you’re doing.
  • On Android tablets and phones, you can encrypt the entire device. You have to set up a screen lock code first.
  • If you use a thumb drive or external hard drive to transfer files between devices, encrypt it.
  • Encrypt your backup hard drives. Backups are one of the most common ways that data is stolen. (You have backups, right? I could write another entire blog post on backups. Three things are inevitable: death, taxes, and loss of data that you really care about.)
  • Use a service such as Prey Project to let you have at least some basic control over your device if it’s lost or stolen. If you’re using an Android device, set up Android Device Manager so you can track and control your device remotely. I don’t know if there’s anything similar for Apple devices.
  • Keep records of your devices’ make, model, serial number, and so on. Prey Project makes this easy.
  • On your phone or tablet, customize the lockscreen with a message such as “user@email.com – reward if found” and on your laptops, stick a small label inside the lid with your name and phone number. You never know if a nice person will return something to you. I know I would do it for you.
Things that don’t help

Finally, here are some techniques that aren’t as useful as you might have been told.

  • Changing passwords doesn’t significantly enhance security unless you change from an insecure password to a strong one. Changing passwords is most useful, in my opinion, when a service has already been compromised or potentially compromised. It’s possible on any given day that an attacker has gotten a list of encrypted passwords for a service, hasn’t yet been discovered, and hasn’t yet decrypted them, and that you’ll foil the attack by changing your password in the meanwhile, but this is such a vanishingly small chance that it’s not meaningful.
  • (OK, this ended up being a list of 1 thing. Tell me what else should go here.)
Summary

Here is a summary of the most valuable steps you can take to protect yourself:

  • Get a password safe, and use it for all of your accounts. Protect it with a long password. Make this the one password you memorize.
  • Use long (as long as possible), randomly generated passwords for all online accounts and services, and never reuse a password.
  • Use two-factor authentication for all services that support it.
  • Encrypt your hard drives, phones and tablets, and backups, and use a password or code to lock all computers, phones, tablets, etc when you turn them off, leave them idle, or put them to sleep.
  • Install something like Prey Project on your portable devices, and label them so nice people can return them to you.
  • Write down the location and access instructions (including passwords) for your password safe, computer, backup hard drives, etc and put it in a safe deposit box.

Friends try not to let friends get hacked and ruined. Don’t stop at upgrading your own security. Please tell your friends and family to do it, too!

Do you have any other suggestions? Please use the comments below to add your thoughts.

Categories: MySQL

Secure your accounts and devices

Xaprb, home of innotop - Wed, 2013-12-18 00:00

This is a public service announcement. Many people I know are not taking important steps necessary to secure their online accounts and devices (computers, cellphones) against malicious people and software. It’s a matter of time before something seriously harmful happens to them.

This blog post will urge you to use higher security than popular advice you’ll hear. It really, really, really is necessary to use strong measures to secure your digital life. The technology being used to attack you is very advanced, operates at a large scale, and you probably stand to lose much more than you realize.

You’re also likely not as good at being secure as you think you are. If you’re like most people, you don’t take some important precautions, and you overestimate the strength and effectiveness of security measures you do use.

Password Security

The simplest and most effective way to dramatically boost your online security is use a password storage program, or password safe. You need to stop making passwords you can remember and make long, random passwords on websites. The only practical way to do this is to use a password safe.

Why? Because if you can remember the password, it’s trivially hackable. For example, passwords like 10qp29wo38ei47ru can be broken instantly. Anything you can feasibly remember is just too weak.

And, any rule you set for yourself that requires self-discipline will be violated, because you’re lazy. You need to make security easier so that you automatically do things more securely. A password safe is the best way to do that, by far. A good rule of thumb for most people is that you should not try to know your own passwords, except the password to your password safe. (People with the need to be hyper-secure will take extraordinary measures, but those aren’t practical or necessary for most of us.)

I use 1Password. Others I know of are LastPass and KeePass Password Safe. I personally wouldn’t use any others, because lesser-known ones are more likely to be malware.

It’s easy to share a password safe’s data across devices, and make a backup of it, by using a service such as Dropbox. The password safe’s files are encrypted, so the contents will not be at risk even if the file syncing service is compromised for some reason. (Use a strong password to encrypt your password safe!)

It’s important to note that online passwords are different from the password you use to log into your personal computer. Online passwords are much more exposed to brute-force, large-scale hacking attacks. By contrast, your laptop probably isn’t going to be subjected to a brute-force password cracking attack, because attackers usually need physical access to the computer to do that. This is not a reason to use a weak password for your computer; I’m just trying to illustrate how important it is to use really long, random passwords for websites and other online services, because they are frequent targets of brute-force attacks.

Here are some other important rules for password security.

  • Never use the same password in more than one service or login. If you do, someone who compromises it will be able to compromise other services you use.
  • Set your password generation program (likely part of your password safe) to make long, random passwords with numbers, special characters, and mixed case. I leave mine set to 20 characters by default. If a website won’t accept such a long password I’ll shorten it. For popular websites such as LinkedIn, Facebook, etc I use much longer passwords, 50 characters or more. They are such valuable attack targets that I’m paranoid.
  • Don’t use your web browser’s features for storing passwords and credit cards. Browsers themselves, and their password storage, are the target of many attacks.
  • Never write passwords down on paper, except once. The only paper copy of my passwords is the master password to my computer, password safe, and GPG key. These are in my bank’s safe deposit box, because if something happens to me I don’t want my family to be completely screwed. (I could write another blog post on the need for a will, power of attorney, advance medical directive, etc.)
  • Never treat any account online, no matter how trivial, as “not important enough for a secure password.” That last item deserves a little story. Ten years ago I didn’t use a password safe, and I treated most websites casually. “Oh, this is just a discussion forum, I don’t care about it.” I used an easy-to-type password for such sites. I used the same one everywhere, and it was a common five-letter English word (not my name, if you’re guessing). Suddenly one day I realized that someone could guess this password easily, log in, change the password and in many cases the email address, and lock me out of my own account. They could then proceed to impersonate me, do illegal and harmful things in my name, etc. Worse, they could go find other places that I had accounts (easy to find – just search Google for my name or username!) and do the same things in many places. I scrambled to find and fix this problem. At the end of it, I realized I had created more than 300 accounts that could have been compromised. Needless to say, I was very, very lucky. My reputation, employment, credit rating, and even my status as a free citizen could have been taken away from me. Don’t let this happen to you!
Use Two-Factor Auth

Two-factor authentication (aka 2-step login) is a much stronger mechanism for account security than a password alone. It uses a “second factor” (something you physically possess) in addition to the common “first factor” (something you know – a password) to verify that you are the person authorized to access the account.

Typically, the login process with two-factor authentication looks like this:

  • You enter your username and password.
  • The service sends a text message to your phone. The message contains a 6-digit number.
  • You must enter the number to finish logging in. With two-factor auth in place, it is very difficult for malicious hackers to access your account, even if they know your password. Two-factor auth is way more secure than other tactics such as long passwords, but it doesn’t mean you shouldn’t also use a password safe and unique, random, non-memorized passwords.

Two-factor auth has a bunch of special ways to handle other common scenarios, such as devices that can’t display the dialog to ask for the 6-digit code, or what if you lose your cellphone, or what if you’re away from your own computer and don’t have your cellphone. Nonetheless, these edge cases are easy to handle. For example, you can get recovery codes for when you lose or don’t have your cellphone. You should store these – where else? – in your password safe.

There seems to be a perception that lots of people think two-factor auth is not convenient. I disagree. I’ve never found it inconvenient, and I use two-factor auth a lot. And I’ve never met these people, whoever they are, who think two-factor auth is such a high burden. The worst thing that happens to me is that I sometimes have to get out of my chair and get my phone from another room to log in.

Unfortunately, most websites don’t support two-factor authentication. Fortunately, many of the most popular and valuable services do, including Facebook, Google, Paypal, Dropbox, LinkedIn, Twitter, and most of the other services that you probably use which are most likely to get compromised. Here is a list of services with two-factor auth, with instructions on how to set it up for each one.

Please enable two-factor authentication if it is supported! I can’t tell you how many of my friends and family have had their Gmail, Facebook, Twitter, and other services compromised. Please don’t let this happen to you! It could do serious harm to you – worse than a stolen credit card.

Secure Your Devices

Sooner or later someone is going to get access to one of your devices – tablet, phone, laptop, thumb drive. I’ve never had a phone or laptop lost or stolen myself, but it’s a matter of time. I’ve known a lot of people in this situation. One of my old bosses, for example, forgot a laptop in the seat pocket of an airplane, and someone took it and didn’t return it.

And how many times have you heard about some government worker leaving a laptop at the coffee shop and suddenly millions of people’s Social Security numbers are stolen?

Think about your phone. If someone stole my phone and it weren’t protected, they’d have access to a bunch of my accounts, contact lists, email, and a lot of other stuff I really, really do not want them messing with. If you’re in the majority of people who leave your phone completely unsecured, think about the consequences for a few minutes. Someone getting access to all the data and accounts on your phone could probably ruin your life for a long time if they wanted to.

All of this is easily preventable. Given that one or more of your devices will someday certainly end up in the hands of someone who may have bad intentions, I think it’s only prudent to take some basic measures:

  • Set the device to require a password, lock code, or pattern to be used to unlock it after it goes to sleep, when it’s idle for a bit, or when you first power it on. If someone steals your device, and can access it without entering your password, you’re well and truly screwed.
  • Use full-device encryption. If someone steals your device, for heaven’s sake don’t let them have access to your data. For Mac users, use File Vault under Preferences / Security and Privacy. Encrypt the whole drive, not just the home directory. On Windows, use TrueCrypt, and on Linux, you probably already know what you’re doing.
  • On Android tablets and phones, you can encrypt the entire device. You have to set up a screen lock code first.
  • If you use a thumb drive or external hard drive to transfer files between devices, encrypt it.
  • Encrypt your backup hard drives. Backups are one of the most common ways that data is stolen. (You have backups, right? I could write another entire blog post on backups. Three things are inevitable: death, taxes, and loss of data that you really care about.)
  • Use a service such as Prey Project to let you have at least some basic control over your device if it’s lost or stolen. Android phones now have the Android Device Manager and Google Location History, but you have to enable these.
  • Keep records of your devices’ make, model, serial number, and so on. Prey Project makes this easy.
  • On your phone or tablet, customize the lockscreen with a message such as “user@email.com – reward if found” and on your laptops, stick a small label inside the lid with your name and phone number. You never know if a nice person will return something to you. I know I would do it for you.
External Links and Resources Things that don’t help

Finally, here are some techniques that aren’t as useful as you might have been told.

  • Changing passwords doesn’t significantly enhance security unless you change from an insecure password to a strong one. Changing passwords is most useful, in my opinion, when a service has already been compromised or potentially compromised. It’s possible on any given day that an attacker has gotten a list of encrypted passwords for a service, hasn’t yet been discovered, and hasn’t yet decrypted them, and that you’ll foil the attack by changing your password in the meanwhile, but this is such a vanishingly small chance that it’s not meaningful.
  • (OK, this ended up being a list of 1 thing. Tell me what else should go here.)
Summary

Here is a summary of the most valuable steps you can take to protect yourself:

  • Get a password safe, and use it for all of your accounts. Protect it with a long password. Make this the one password you memorize.
  • Use long (as long as possible), randomly generated passwords for all online accounts and services, and never reuse a password.
  • Use two-factor authentication for all services that support it.
  • Encrypt your hard drives, phones and tablets, and backups, and use a password or code to lock all computers, phones, tablets, etc when you turn them off, leave them idle, or put them to sleep.
  • Install something like Prey Project on your portable devices, and label them so nice people can return them to you.
  • Write down the location and access instructions (including passwords) for your password safe, computer, backup hard drives, etc and put it in a safe deposit box. Friends try not to let friends get hacked and ruined. Don’t stop at upgrading your own security. Please tell your friends and family to do it, too!

Do you have any other suggestions? Please use the comments below to add your thoughts.

Categories: MySQL

How is the MariaDB Knowledge Base licensed?

Xaprb, home of innotop - Mon, 2013-12-16 22:37

I clicked around for a few moments but didn’t immediately see a license mentioned for the MariaDB knowledgebase. As far as I know, the MySQL documentation is not licensed in a way that would allow copying or derivative works, but at least some of the MariaDB Knowledge Base seems to be pretty similar to the corresponding MySQL documentation. See for example LOAD DATA LOCAL INFILE: MariaDB, MySQL.

Oracle’s MySQL documentation has a licensing notice that states:

You may create a printed copy of this documentation solely for your own personal use. Conversion to other formats is allowed as long as the actual content is not altered or edited in any way. You shall not publish or distribute this documentation in any form or on any media, except if you distribute the documentation in a manner similar to how Oracle disseminates it (that is, electronically for download on a Web site with the software) or on a CD-ROM or similar medium, provided however that the documentation is disseminated together with the software on the same medium. Any other use, such as any dissemination of printed copies or use of this documentation, in whole or in part, in another publication, requires the prior written consent from an authorized representative of Oracle. Oracle and/or its affiliates reserve any and all rights to this documentation not expressly granted above.

Can someone clarify the situation?

Categories: MySQL

How is the MariaDB Knowledge Base licensed?

Xaprb, home of innotop - Mon, 2013-12-16 00:00

I clicked around for a few moments but didn’t immediately see a license mentioned for the MariaDB knowledgebase. As far as I know, the MySQL documentation is not licensed in a way that would allow copying or derivative works, but at least some of the MariaDB Knowledge Base seems to be pretty similar to the corresponding MySQL documentation. See for example LOAD DATA LOCAL INFILE: MariaDB, MySQL.

Oracle’s MySQL documentation has a licensing notice that states:

You may create a printed copy of this documentation solely for your own personal use. Conversion to other formats is allowed as long as the actual content is not altered or edited in any way. You shall not publish or distribute this documentation in any form or on any media, except if you distribute the documentation in a manner similar to how Oracle disseminates it (that is, electronically for download on a Web site with the software) or on a CD-ROM or similar medium, provided however that the documentation is disseminated together with the software on the same medium. Any other use, such as any dissemination of printed copies or use of this documentation, in whole or in part, in another publication, requires the prior written consent from an authorized representative of Oracle. Oracle and/or its affiliates reserve any and all rights to this documentation not expressly granted above.

Can someone clarify the situation?

Categories: MySQL

Props to the MySQL Community Team

Xaprb, home of innotop - Sat, 2013-12-07 21:02

Enough negativity sometimes gets slung around that it’s easy to forget how much good is going on. I want to give a public thumbs-up to the great job the MySQL community team, especially Morgan Tocker, is doing. I don’t remember ever having so much good interaction with this team, not even in the “good old days”:

  • Advance notice of things they’re thinking about doing (deprecating, changing, adding, etc)
  • Heads-up via private emails about news and upcoming things of interest (new features, upcoming announcements that aren’t public yet, etc)
  • Solicitation of opinion on proposals that are being floated internally (do you use this feature, would it hurt you if we removed this option, do you care about this legacy behavior we’re thinking about sanitizing)

I don’t know who or what has made this change happen, but it’s really welcome. I know Oracle is a giant company with all sorts of legal and regulatory hoops to jump through, for things that seem like they ought to be obviously the right thing to do in an open-source community. I had thought we were not going to get this kind of interaction from them, but happily I was wrong.

(At the same time, I still wish for more public bug reports and test cases; I believe those things are really in everyone’s best interests, both short- and long-term.)

Categories: MySQL

S**t sales engineers say

Xaprb, home of innotop - Sat, 2013-12-07 20:51

Here’s a trip down memory lane. I was just cleaning out some stuff and I found some notes I took from a hilarious MySQL seminar a few years back. I won’t say when or where, to protect the guilty.[1]

I found it so absurd that I had to write down what I was witnessing. Enough time has passed that we can probably all laugh about this now. Times and people have changed.

The seminar was a sales pitch in disguise, of course. The speakers were singing Powerpoint Karaoke to slides real tech people had written. Every now and then, when they advanced a slide, they must have had a panicked moment. “I don’t remember this slide at all!” they must have been thinking. So they’d mumble something really funny and trying-too-hard-to-be-casual about “oh, yeah, [insert topic here] but you all already know this, I won’t bore you with the details [advance slide hastily].” It’s strange how transparent that is to the audience.

Here are some of the things the sales “engineers” said during this seminar, in response to audience questions:

  • Q. How does auto-increment work in replication? A: On slaves, you have to ALTER TABLE to remove auto-increment because only one table in a cluster can be auto-increment. When you switch replication to a different master you have to ALTER TABLE on all servers in the whole cluster to add/remove auto-increment. (This lie was told early in the day. Each successive person who took a turn presenting built upon it instead of correcting it. I’m not sure whether this was admirable teamwork or cowardly face-saving.)
  • Q. Does InnoDB’s log grow forever? A: Yes. You have to back up, delete, and restore your database if you want to shrink it.
  • Q. What size sort buffer should I have? A: 128MB is the suggested starting point. You want this sucker to be BIG.

There was more, but that’s enough for a chuckle. Note to sales engineers everywhere: beware the guy in the front row scribbling notes and grinning.

What are your best memories of worst sales engineer moments?

1. For the avoidance of doubt, it was NOT any of the trainers, support staff, consultants, or otherwise anyone prominently visible to the community. Nor was it anyone else whose name I’ve mentioned before. I doubt any readers of this blog, except for former MySQL AB employees (pre-Sun), would have ever heard of these people. I had to think hard to remember who those names belonged to.

Categories: MySQL

Props to the MySQL Community Team

Xaprb, home of innotop - Sat, 2013-12-07 00:00

Enough negativity sometimes gets slung around that it’s easy to forget how much good is going on. I want to give a public thumbs-up to the great job the MySQL community team, especially Morgan Tocker, is doing. I don’t remember ever having so much good interaction with this team, not even in the “good old days”:

  • Advance notice of things they’re thinking about doing (deprecating, changing, adding, etc)
  • Heads-up via private emails about news and upcoming things of interest (new features, upcoming announcements that aren’t public yet, etc)
  • Solicitation of opinion on proposals that are being floated internally (do you use this feature, would it hurt you if we removed this option, do you care about this legacy behavior we’re thinking about sanitizing) I don’t know who or what has made this change happen, but it’s really welcome. I know Oracle is a giant company with all sorts of legal and regulatory hoops to jump through, for things that seem like they ought to be obviously the right thing to do in an open-source community. I had thought we were not going to get this kind of interaction from them, but happily I was wrong.

(At the same time, I still wish for more public bug reports and test cases; I believe those things are really in everyone’s best interests, both short- and long-term.)

Categories: MySQL

S**t sales engineers say

Xaprb, home of innotop - Sat, 2013-12-07 00:00

Here’s a trip down memory lane. I was just cleaning out some stuff and I found some notes I took from a hilarious MySQL seminar a few years back. I won’t say when or where, to protect the guilty.[1]

I found it so absurd that I had to write down what I was witnessing. Enough time has passed that we can probably all laugh about this now. Times and people have changed.

The seminar was a sales pitch in disguise, of course. The speakers were singing Powerpoint Karaoke to slides real tech people had written. Every now and then, when they advanced a slide, they must have had a panicked moment. “I don’t remember this slide at all!” they must have been thinking. So they’d mumble something really funny and trying-too-hard-to-be-casual about “oh, yeah, [insert topic here] but you all already know this, I won’t bore you with the details [advance slide hastily].” It’s strange how transparent that is to the audience.

Here are some of the things the sales “engineers” said during this seminar, in response to audience questions:

  • Q. How does auto-increment work in replication? A: On slaves, you have to ALTER TABLE to remove auto-increment because only one table in a cluster can be auto-increment. When you switch replication to a different master you have to ALTER TABLE on all servers in the whole cluster to add/remove auto-increment. (This lie was told early in the day. Each successive person who took a turn presenting built upon it instead of correcting it. I’m not sure whether this was admirable teamwork or cowardly face-saving.)
  • Q. Does InnoDB’s log grow forever? A: Yes. You have to back up, delete, and restore your database if you want to shrink it.
  • Q. What size sort buffer should I have? A: 128MB is the suggested starting point. You want this sucker to be BIG.

There was more, but that’s enough for a chuckle. Note to sales engineers everywhere: beware the guy in the front row scribbling notes and grinning.

What are your best memories of worst sales engineer moments?

1. For the avoidance of doubt, it was NOT any of the trainers, support staff, consultants, or otherwise anyone prominently visible to the community. Nor was it anyone else whose name I’ve mentioned before. I doubt any readers of this blog, except for former MySQL AB employees (pre-Sun), would have ever heard of these people. I had to think hard to remember who those names belonged to.

Categories: MySQL

EXPLAIN UPDATE in MySQL 5.6

Xaprb, home of innotop - Tue, 2013-11-26 21:35

I just tried out EXPLAIN UPDATE in MySQL 5.6 and found unexpected results. This query has no usable index: EXPLAIN UPDATE ... WHERE col1 = 9 AND col2 = 'something'\G *************************** 1. row *************************** id: 1 select_type: SIMPLE table: foo type: index possible_keys: NULL key: PRIMARY key_len: 55 ref: NULL rows: 51 Extra: Using where

The EXPLAIN output makes it seem like a perfectly fine query, but it’s a full table scan. If I do the old trick of rewriting it to a SELECT I see that: *************************** 1. row *************************** id: 1 select_type: SIMPLE table: foo type: ALL possible_keys: NULL key: NULL key_len: NULL ref: NULL rows: 51 Extra: Using where

Should I file this as a bug? It seems like one to me.

Categories: MySQL

EXPLAIN UPDATE in MySQL 5.6

Xaprb, home of innotop - Tue, 2013-11-26 00:00

I just tried out EXPLAIN UPDATE in MySQL 5.6 and found unexpected results. This query has no usable index:

EXPLAIN UPDATE ... WHERE col1 = 9 AND col2 = 'something'\G *************************** 1. row *************************** id: 1 select_type: SIMPLE table: foo type: index possible_keys: NULL key: PRIMARY key_len: 55 ref: NULL rows: 51 Extra: Using where

The EXPLAIN output makes it seem like a perfectly fine query, but it’s a full table scan. If I do the old trick of rewriting it to a SELECT I see that:

*************************** 1. row *************************** id: 1 select_type: SIMPLE table: foo type: ALL possible_keys: NULL key: NULL key_len: NULL ref: NULL rows: 51 Extra: Using where

Should I file this as a bug? It seems like one to me.

Categories: MySQL

Freeing some Velocity videos

Xaprb, home of innotop - Sat, 2013-11-09 17:51

Following my previous post on Velocity videos, I had some private email conversations with good folks at O’Reilly, and a really nice in-person exchange with a top-level person as well. I was surprised to hear them encourage me to publish my videos online freely!

I still believe that nothing substitutes for the experience of attending an O’Reilly conference in-person, but I’ll also be the first to admit that my talks are usually more conceptual and academic than practical, and designed to start a conversation rather than to tell you the Truth According To Baron. Thus, I think they’re worth sharing more widely.

O’Reilly alleviated my concerns about “killing the golden goose,” but I like one person’s take on the cost of O’Reilly’s conferences. “You think education is expensive? Try ignorance.”

I’ll post some of my past talks soon for your enjoyment.

Categories: MySQL

Freeing some Velocity videos

Xaprb, home of innotop - Sat, 2013-11-09 00:00

Following my previous post on Velocity videos, I had some private email conversations with good folks at O’Reilly, and a really nice in-person exchange with a top-level person as well. I was surprised to hear them encourage me to publish my videos online freely!

I still believe that nothing substitutes for the experience of attending an O’Reilly conference in-person, but I’ll also be the first to admit that my talks are usually more conceptual and academic than practical, and designed to start a conversation rather than to tell you the Truth According To Baron. Thus, I think they’re worth sharing more widely.

O’Reilly alleviated my concerns about “killing the golden goose,” but I like one person’s take on the cost of O’Reilly’s conferences. “You think education is expensive? Try ignorance.”

I’ll post some of my past talks soon for your enjoyment.

Categories: MySQL
Syndicate content