MySQL

How is the MariaDB Knowledge Base licensed?

Xaprb, home of innotop - Mon, 2013-12-16 00:00

I clicked around for a few moments but didn’t immediately see a license mentioned for the MariaDB knowledgebase. As far as I know, the MySQL documentation is not licensed in a way that would allow copying or derivative works, but at least some of the MariaDB Knowledge Base seems to be pretty similar to the corresponding MySQL documentation. See for example LOAD DATA LOCAL INFILE: MariaDB, MySQL.

Oracle’s MySQL documentation has a licensing notice that states:

You may create a printed copy of this documentation solely for your own personal use. Conversion to other formats is allowed as long as the actual content is not altered or edited in any way. You shall not publish or distribute this documentation in any form or on any media, except if you distribute the documentation in a manner similar to how Oracle disseminates it (that is, electronically for download on a Web site with the software) or on a CD-ROM or similar medium, provided however that the documentation is disseminated together with the software on the same medium. Any other use, such as any dissemination of printed copies or use of this documentation, in whole or in part, in another publication, requires the prior written consent from an authorized representative of Oracle. Oracle and/or its affiliates reserve any and all rights to this documentation not expressly granted above.

Can someone clarify the situation?

Categories: MySQL

Props to the MySQL Community Team

Xaprb, home of innotop - Sat, 2013-12-07 21:02

Enough negativity sometimes gets slung around that it’s easy to forget how much good is going on. I want to give a public thumbs-up to the great job the MySQL community team, especially Morgan Tocker, is doing. I don’t remember ever having so much good interaction with this team, not even in the “good old days”:

  • Advance notice of things they’re thinking about doing (deprecating, changing, adding, etc)
  • Heads-up via private emails about news and upcoming things of interest (new features, upcoming announcements that aren’t public yet, etc)
  • Solicitation of opinion on proposals that are being floated internally (do you use this feature, would it hurt you if we removed this option, do you care about this legacy behavior we’re thinking about sanitizing)

I don’t know who or what has made this change happen, but it’s really welcome. I know Oracle is a giant company with all sorts of legal and regulatory hoops to jump through, for things that seem like they ought to be obviously the right thing to do in an open-source community. I had thought we were not going to get this kind of interaction from them, but happily I was wrong.

(At the same time, I still wish for more public bug reports and test cases; I believe those things are really in everyone’s best interests, both short- and long-term.)

Categories: MySQL

S**t sales engineers say

Xaprb, home of innotop - Sat, 2013-12-07 20:51

Here’s a trip down memory lane. I was just cleaning out some stuff and I found some notes I took from a hilarious MySQL seminar a few years back. I won’t say when or where, to protect the guilty.[1]

I found it so absurd that I had to write down what I was witnessing. Enough time has passed that we can probably all laugh about this now. Times and people have changed.

The seminar was a sales pitch in disguise, of course. The speakers were singing Powerpoint Karaoke to slides real tech people had written. Every now and then, when they advanced a slide, they must have had a panicked moment. “I don’t remember this slide at all!” they must have been thinking. So they’d mumble something really funny and trying-too-hard-to-be-casual about “oh, yeah, [insert topic here] but you all already know this, I won’t bore you with the details [advance slide hastily].” It’s strange how transparent that is to the audience.

Here are some of the things the sales “engineers” said during this seminar, in response to audience questions:

  • Q. How does auto-increment work in replication? A: On slaves, you have to ALTER TABLE to remove auto-increment because only one table in a cluster can be auto-increment. When you switch replication to a different master you have to ALTER TABLE on all servers in the whole cluster to add/remove auto-increment. (This lie was told early in the day. Each successive person who took a turn presenting built upon it instead of correcting it. I’m not sure whether this was admirable teamwork or cowardly face-saving.)
  • Q. Does InnoDB’s log grow forever? A: Yes. You have to back up, delete, and restore your database if you want to shrink it.
  • Q. What size sort buffer should I have? A: 128MB is the suggested starting point. You want this sucker to be BIG.

There was more, but that’s enough for a chuckle. Note to sales engineers everywhere: beware the guy in the front row scribbling notes and grinning.

What are your best memories of worst sales engineer moments?

1. For the avoidance of doubt, it was NOT any of the trainers, support staff, consultants, or otherwise anyone prominently visible to the community. Nor was it anyone else whose name I’ve mentioned before. I doubt any readers of this blog, except for former MySQL AB employees (pre-Sun), would have ever heard of these people. I had to think hard to remember who those names belonged to.

Categories: MySQL

Props to the MySQL Community Team

Xaprb, home of innotop - Sat, 2013-12-07 00:00

Enough negativity sometimes gets slung around that it’s easy to forget how much good is going on. I want to give a public thumbs-up to the great job the MySQL community team, especially Morgan Tocker, is doing. I don’t remember ever having so much good interaction with this team, not even in the “good old days”:

  • Advance notice of things they’re thinking about doing (deprecating, changing, adding, etc)
  • Heads-up via private emails about news and upcoming things of interest (new features, upcoming announcements that aren’t public yet, etc)
  • Solicitation of opinion on proposals that are being floated internally (do you use this feature, would it hurt you if we removed this option, do you care about this legacy behavior we’re thinking about sanitizing) I don’t know who or what has made this change happen, but it’s really welcome. I know Oracle is a giant company with all sorts of legal and regulatory hoops to jump through, for things that seem like they ought to be obviously the right thing to do in an open-source community. I had thought we were not going to get this kind of interaction from them, but happily I was wrong.

(At the same time, I still wish for more public bug reports and test cases; I believe those things are really in everyone’s best interests, both short- and long-term.)

Categories: MySQL

S**t sales engineers say

Xaprb, home of innotop - Sat, 2013-12-07 00:00

Here’s a trip down memory lane. I was just cleaning out some stuff and I found some notes I took from a hilarious MySQL seminar a few years back. I won’t say when or where, to protect the guilty.[1]

I found it so absurd that I had to write down what I was witnessing. Enough time has passed that we can probably all laugh about this now. Times and people have changed.

The seminar was a sales pitch in disguise, of course. The speakers were singing Powerpoint Karaoke to slides real tech people had written. Every now and then, when they advanced a slide, they must have had a panicked moment. “I don’t remember this slide at all!” they must have been thinking. So they’d mumble something really funny and trying-too-hard-to-be-casual about “oh, yeah, [insert topic here] but you all already know this, I won’t bore you with the details [advance slide hastily].” It’s strange how transparent that is to the audience.

Here are some of the things the sales “engineers” said during this seminar, in response to audience questions:

  • Q. How does auto-increment work in replication? A: On slaves, you have to ALTER TABLE to remove auto-increment because only one table in a cluster can be auto-increment. When you switch replication to a different master you have to ALTER TABLE on all servers in the whole cluster to add/remove auto-increment. (This lie was told early in the day. Each successive person who took a turn presenting built upon it instead of correcting it. I’m not sure whether this was admirable teamwork or cowardly face-saving.)
  • Q. Does InnoDB’s log grow forever? A: Yes. You have to back up, delete, and restore your database if you want to shrink it.
  • Q. What size sort buffer should I have? A: 128MB is the suggested starting point. You want this sucker to be BIG.

There was more, but that’s enough for a chuckle. Note to sales engineers everywhere: beware the guy in the front row scribbling notes and grinning.

What are your best memories of worst sales engineer moments?

1. For the avoidance of doubt, it was NOT any of the trainers, support staff, consultants, or otherwise anyone prominently visible to the community. Nor was it anyone else whose name I’ve mentioned before. I doubt any readers of this blog, except for former MySQL AB employees (pre-Sun), would have ever heard of these people. I had to think hard to remember who those names belonged to.

Categories: MySQL

EXPLAIN UPDATE in MySQL 5.6

Xaprb, home of innotop - Tue, 2013-11-26 21:35

I just tried out EXPLAIN UPDATE in MySQL 5.6 and found unexpected results. This query has no usable index: EXPLAIN UPDATE ... WHERE col1 = 9 AND col2 = 'something'\G *************************** 1. row *************************** id: 1 select_type: SIMPLE table: foo type: index possible_keys: NULL key: PRIMARY key_len: 55 ref: NULL rows: 51 Extra: Using where

The EXPLAIN output makes it seem like a perfectly fine query, but it’s a full table scan. If I do the old trick of rewriting it to a SELECT I see that: *************************** 1. row *************************** id: 1 select_type: SIMPLE table: foo type: ALL possible_keys: NULL key: NULL key_len: NULL ref: NULL rows: 51 Extra: Using where

Should I file this as a bug? It seems like one to me.

Categories: MySQL

EXPLAIN UPDATE in MySQL 5.6

Xaprb, home of innotop - Tue, 2013-11-26 00:00

I just tried out EXPLAIN UPDATE in MySQL 5.6 and found unexpected results. This query has no usable index:

EXPLAIN UPDATE ... WHERE col1 = 9 AND col2 = 'something'\G *************************** 1. row *************************** id: 1 select_type: SIMPLE table: foo type: index possible_keys: NULL key: PRIMARY key_len: 55 ref: NULL rows: 51 Extra: Using where

The EXPLAIN output makes it seem like a perfectly fine query, but it’s a full table scan. If I do the old trick of rewriting it to a SELECT I see that:

*************************** 1. row *************************** id: 1 select_type: SIMPLE table: foo type: ALL possible_keys: NULL key: NULL key_len: NULL ref: NULL rows: 51 Extra: Using where

Should I file this as a bug? It seems like one to me.

Categories: MySQL

Freeing some Velocity videos

Xaprb, home of innotop - Sat, 2013-11-09 17:51

Following my previous post on Velocity videos, I had some private email conversations with good folks at O’Reilly, and a really nice in-person exchange with a top-level person as well. I was surprised to hear them encourage me to publish my videos online freely!

I still believe that nothing substitutes for the experience of attending an O’Reilly conference in-person, but I’ll also be the first to admit that my talks are usually more conceptual and academic than practical, and designed to start a conversation rather than to tell you the Truth According To Baron. Thus, I think they’re worth sharing more widely.

O’Reilly alleviated my concerns about “killing the golden goose,” but I like one person’s take on the cost of O’Reilly’s conferences. “You think education is expensive? Try ignorance.”

I’ll post some of my past talks soon for your enjoyment.

Categories: MySQL

Freeing some Velocity videos

Xaprb, home of innotop - Sat, 2013-11-09 00:00

Following my previous post on Velocity videos, I had some private email conversations with good folks at O’Reilly, and a really nice in-person exchange with a top-level person as well. I was surprised to hear them encourage me to publish my videos online freely!

I still believe that nothing substitutes for the experience of attending an O’Reilly conference in-person, but I’ll also be the first to admit that my talks are usually more conceptual and academic than practical, and designed to start a conversation rather than to tell you the Truth According To Baron. Thus, I think they’re worth sharing more widely.

O’Reilly alleviated my concerns about “killing the golden goose,” but I like one person’s take on the cost of O’Reilly’s conferences. “You think education is expensive? Try ignorance.”

I’ll post some of my past talks soon for your enjoyment.

Categories: MySQL
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